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Archive for the ‘Gas Powered Golfcarts’ Category

Looking for an EZGO Owners Manual?

October 21, 2010 Comments off

EZGO Introduces Freedom® TXT® and Shuttle 2+2 TXT® Vehicles

October 19, 2010 Comments off

(AUGUSTA, GA) — E-Z-GO, a Textron (NYSE:TXT) Company, announces the expansion of its line of personal vehicles with the introduction of the Freedom® TXT® and Shuttle 2+2 TXT®. These vehicles combine the classic styling and features of the E-Z-GO TXT platform with new powerplants and technology, including the choice of models equipped with either a 48-volt DC electric drivetrain or a 13 hp gas-powered Kawasaki® engine.

The Freedom TXT seats up to two people and is equipped with a golf-bag rack and sweater basket for easy transition from the course to community paths. With its rear-facing second bench seat, the Shuttle 2+2 TXT seats up to four people and can be outfitted with an optional four-bag attachment for golf use.

“E-Z-GO is pleased to offer these new models in our celebrated TXT vehicle line,” said Kevin Holleran, president of E-Z-GO. “The combination of proven TXT features and new powertrain technology will make the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT vehicles a popular choice for consumers seeking stylish, fun and energy-efficient ways to move around their neighborhood paths.”

Electric models of the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT feature a 48-volt DC drivetrain with    E-Z-GO’s exclusive TruCourse Technology, which allows the vehicle owner to customize the vehicle’s speed, acceleration and other operating characteristics to meet their unique needs.

Gas-powered models are equipped with a 13 hp Kawasaki engine that delivers exceptional power and torque, while conserving fuel due to the engine’s single-cylinder design with a hemispheric combustion chamber. The engine meets all emissions standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board.

Both models retain the popular styling and proven features of the E-Z-GO TXT platform, including a welded tubular steel frame with powder-coat protection, scratch-resistant body panels, center-mounted cup, ball and tee holders, slip-resistant floormats, double-walled canopy and handle, and a walkaway braking alarm.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT also feature headlights, tail lights, brake lights and horns. Electric models include a DC-to-DC converter to allow for optimal installation of additional powered accessories.

To meet the specific needs or style of any owner, the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT can be customized with a wide variety of factory-installed options or E-Z-GO genuine parts and accessories, including alloy wheels, turn signals, weather enclosures, locking glove boxes, and chrome or stainless-steel brush guards and kickplates.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT are manufactured in Augusta, Ga., at E-Z-GO’s world headquarters, recently honored as one of the top ten manufacturing facilities in North America by Industry Week magazine.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT vehicles are available for purchase now from your local E-Z-GO authorized dealer. To locate your nearest dealer or learn more about the complete line of E-Z-GO light-transportation vehicles, please visit www.ezgo.com. To follow E-Z-GO news, events and announcements on Facebook, please visit www.facebook.com/4ezgo.

Easy instructions on how to change oil on your E-Z-GO Golf cart

September 21, 2010 Comments off

All parts needed are available at RMI Golf carts!

Instructions

Things You’ll Need:

  • Lint-free rag
  • Oil drain pan
  • Wrench
  • Engine degreaser and paintbrush, or compressed air
  • Funnel
  • 10W-30 grade engine oil
  1. Start the engine and allow it to warm. Park the golf cart on a level surface, apply the parking brake and remove the ignition key.
  2. Clean the top of the engine’s oil cap, as well as the area immediately surrounding the cap, with a lint-free rag to avoid having potentially harmful debris inadvertently enter the engine when the oil cap is removed.
  3. Place an oil drain pan underneath the oil filter. The oil filter is located within a triangular metal housing and is attached to the engine with three bolts.
  4. Remove the oil filter’s three retaining bolts with a wrench, then pull the filter out of the engine and allow the oil to drain into the pan. Do not lose the large rubber O-ring that surrounds the filter.
  5. Clean the oil filter with either an engine degreaser, available at most automotive parts stores, or with compressed air. If using a degreaser, brush the degreaser onto the filter with a paintbrush and allow it to air dry. If using compressed air, direct the air through the filter at no more than 30 pounds per square inch, and from a distance not less than 3 inches.
  6. Wipe the area surrounding the engine’s oil filter mount with a lint-free rag, then slide the oil filter into place within the engine and install the filter’s three retaining bolts with a wrench.
  7. Twist off the engine’s oil cap from the top of the engine, and insert a funnel into the opening. Pour 10W-30 grade engine oil into the funnel in small increments, periodically stopping to check the fluid level on the engine’s oil dipstick. The dipstick has two lines and the letter “F” stamped into it. The line just under the letter “F” represents the full mark, while the bottom line represents the minimum quantity of oil the engine requires to safely operate. Pour oil into the funnel until the oil level on the dipstick is between the two lines.
  8. Remove the funnel from the oil cap opening, and install the oil cap

Owner’s manual for your Yamaha G-Max Golf Cart

September 20, 2010 Comments off

Here’s your Yamaha Golfcart Manuals for Yamaha G-Max Gas and Electric.

Yamaha G22E owners Manual

Yamaha G22A Owners Manual

Are you look owner’s manual for your Yamaha Drive Golfcart?

September 20, 2010 Comments off

Here’s your Yamaha Golfcart Manuals for Yamaha Drive Gas and Electric.

Yamaha YDRE Owner’s Manual

Yamaha YDRA Owner’s Manual Gas

Which should you choose Gas vs. Electric?

August 18, 2010 Comments off
E-Z-GO ST Custom

E-Z-GO's ST Custom

 

Thousands of golfers drive golf carts each day as they maneuver the many courses in the United States and around the globe. Thousands more use golf carts for regular transportation. Anyone who has considered buying a golf cart knows the first step is to decide whether to buy a gas or electric golf cart. Each of the two main varieties offer a range of benefits and drawbacks, and understanding them plays a key role in the selection process. 

The Facts 

Gas-powered golf carts operate with a traditional combustion engine. Most are four-cycle engines, but some two-cycle engines exist. Drivers fuel them with regular automobile gas, which can be added via a traditional gas station fuel pump or by dumping in gas from a can. Large rechargeable 38- or 48-volt battery cells power electric golf carts. The batteries must be charged regularly to ensure that the carts can continue to operate. When battery power fades, the cart’s speed slows. Both types of carts have benefits and drawbacks, and the cart that a particular person prefers depends largely on personal preferences and intended use. Most cart owners drive battery-powered carts. 

Gas Benefits 

Some golf cart owners prefer gas-powered golf carts because they run at faster speeds, can pull heavier loads and are easy to refill. More speed means making it from one place to the next in less time. As well, faster carts are sometimes allowed to drive on roads where slow-moving electric carts are not able to maintain minimum speeds. Given their benefits, gas carts are often popular among those who prefer a custom-built cart. These sorts of carts feature more amenities and options, which drives up the price of the carts. 

Electric Benefits 

Electric golf carts produce no emissions. Thus, they are friendlier to the environment. They also produce less noise than gas carts. Most electric golf carts cost slightly less to purchase and they are less frequently used for custom-built carts. Used electric carts are generally less costly to purchase than their gas-powered counterparts and they are more readily available. As well, electric golf carts cost less to maintain and operate because recharging them is less expensive than buying gas for a gas cart and because they do not require as much constant maintenance. 

Gas Drawbacks 

With gas-powered carts, a driver only needs to dump a gallon of fuel into a cart to resume operation, but the fuel also produces more pollution. The carbon-monoxide emissions pose a threat to health when carts are operated within enclosed spaces such as a garage. As well, gas carts make more noise and require regular maintenance in the form of oil changes. 

Electric Drawbacks 

Electric golf carts pose problems because it can be more difficult to estimate when they will run out of power and they are more difficult to recharge. If a cart runs out of battery power on the golf course or in another location away from a charging unit, drivers can be stranded; in addition, electric carts feature batteries that are not easily removed for charging. In many cases, they need to be towed or pushed when they run out of power. 

Source: EHow.com
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