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Archive for the ‘Choosing a Golfcart’ Category

E-Z-GO Street Legal 2five given to Justin Bieber.

February 11, 2011 Comments off

Check out E-Z-GO on the Ellen DeGeneres Show! She gave Justin Bieber an E-Z-GO 2Five for his birthday. Take a look at our Ellen Show photo album and visit this link to see the E-Z-GO 2Five as the Backstage Photo of the Week.

http://ellen.warnerbros.com/2011/02/backstage_photo_of_the_week_preparing_the_biebermobile_0209.php

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Bad Boy Buggies Spec Sheets

December 3, 2010 Comments off

Bad Boy Buggies spec sheets for the following models, XTO, Classic, and LT. Click on the links below.

BBB_SpecSheet_Classic

BBB_SpecSheet_LT

BBB_SpecSheet_XTO

Gas vs Electric Powered Golf Carts

November 10, 2010 Comments off

Application & Preference

When new customers come in they invariably ask, “What’s better, gas or electric?” My answer is always the same – it largely depends on how you plan to use your golf car and what your preferences are. These days, people get pretty creative with their golf carts so the intended uses can vary more than you might think. For the average user either type of golf car will make a perfectly fine recreational vehicle. Electric golf carts run nearly silently and have no fuels or oils to deal with, perfect for supporters of the green movement. Gas golf carts are a little more on the noisy side and will obviously require gas to operate – regular unleaded, to be exact.

Electric golf carts do depend on their batteries for power, so if you’re someone who wants to use your golf cart for hours upon hours at a time, you may want to stick with gas. This especially holds true for those that enjoy camping and RVing – if you don’t have access to power neither will your electric golf cart.

Another point that’s often forgotten is the amount of accessories you plan to install on your golf cart. If you want stereos, lighting, fans, heaters, etc. all of this takes a considerable amount of power. For an electric cart this energy comes right out of the same bank of batteries that your motor relies on. Gas golf cart accessories will also rely on battery power, however, they feature a starter/generator that will charge the battery on its own while the gas pedal is depressed. This doesn’t mean a gas golf cart battery is invincible – any accessories left on while the cart isn’t running will eventually kill your battery.

Performance

In the beginning, golf cars were designed to simply be what their name implies – cars for golfing. While either type of cart can easily haul you and a friend around most reasonable kinds of terrain there are other points to consider when making a decision – especially for those who expect (or demand) a little more.

With horsepower ratings ranging from 10-12 HP, gas golf cars are as much as 3-4 times more powerful than their electric counterparts. An electric golf cart, on average, will feature a 3-5 HP electric motor – but that’s not to say electric carts aren’t impressively powerful in their own right. Light hauling and yard work can be done with either type of vehicle and both will perform satisfactorily. However, those who demand power in off-road conditions with rugged terrain and steep inclines will almost always want to stick with gas power.

As we mentioned before, electric golf carts aren’t for those who wish to joy ride for hours a day. An electric cart will typically get around two hours of continuous motor run time before the batteries will need re-charging. This translates to anywhere between 18-25 miles depending on usage and the terrain – still pretty impressive. On the gas side of things manufacturers have made great strides in improving gas efficiency and the Yamaha Drive currently leads the pack in fuel economy by averaging nearly 29 MPG.

Aside from power sources and horsepower ratings, both types of vehicles operate in much the same fashion. To the untrained eye you couldn’t tell the two apart from each other and for the most part they both ride and handle the same. Both types of vehicles will get about 14-15 mph top-speed (unmodified).

Maintenance

All in all, both types of golf carts have fairly light requirements when it comes to maintenance. With electric carts your main concern lies within your batteries – make sure you check the water levels monthly (at least) and top-off as needed. The batteries are the life-blood of an electric car and with a replacement set costing well over $600 these days it’s not something you want to ignore. With proper maintenance of batteries and responsible charging habits you can expect to get 5-6 years (sometimes longer) of solid performance before they will need replacing. In comparison, neglecting your batteries can shorten their lifespan to as little as 1-2 years.

Gas golf carts, on the other hand, do require periodic oil changes as well as replacement air/fuel filters and spark plugs when necessary. For the do-it-yourselfer it’s pretty routine stuff if you don’t mind getting a little dirty. Filters are relatively inexpensive and golf cart motors take only a quart or so of 10W30 oil after every 250 hours of motor run time. The best way to stay on top of maintenance is to purchase and install an hour meter for the motor and with proper care a gas golf cart can last you a lifetime.

Summary

Now that you have a better idea of how both gas and electric golf cars operate, hopefully you’ll have an easier time making a decision. Keep in mind, this article is comparing “standard” golf carts. There are motor and controller upgrades out there to get the power of a gas golf car (and more) in electric form – though that is beyond the scope of this article.

Source: Diversified Golf Cars

Energy effieciency report on golf carts

October 20, 2010 Comments off

NEW REPORT UNCOVERS ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF GOLF CARTS

–  Evaluation compares gas, electric and solar-assisted golf carts and shows electric golf carts
leading the way to better energy savings –

TORONTO, Oct. 20 /CNW/ – A new report, by the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program (STEP), a multi-agency program led by the Toronto and Region Conservation, is shedding new light on the energy efficiency of gas, electric and solar-assisted golf carts. The report, released today, determined that gas carts were on average over three times less fuel efficient than an electric golf cart. In real terms, the difference in fuel economy between a gas and electric golf cart is similar to that of a Hummer H3 SUV and a Toyota Prius Hybrid car.1  Findings show that electric carts have 85 per cent lower fuel costs and produce one-quarter of the emissions of gas carts. STEP also determined that a solar-assisted golf cart isn’t the only solution when looking to reduce air pollution and cutting greenhouse gas emissions.

“We started this study with the assumption that the solar-assisted golf carts would be best solution, but what we’ve found is that electric golf carts are actually a better investment for golf courses both financially and environmentally,” said Ted Sherk, Project Co-ordinator, STEP, Toronto and Region Conservation. “The addition of solar panels to a golf cart can slightly improve performance and when we surveyed more than 50 golfers many thought the solar carts were a great idea which would help with a golf course’s green image. But aside from being a marketing advantage, the data in this study shows that electric carts can provide energy savings at a lower cost than the solar-assisted carts, by simply maintaining the carts in good condition.”

The team at STEP did a side-by-side field evaluation of two solar-assisted electric golf carts, two standard electric golf carts and two gas-powered golf carts at Bathurst Glen Golf Course in Richmond Hill, Ontario. Over a three month period, the study measured the carts energy use and associated Green House Gas (GHG) emissions, dependability, overall capital and operating cost, and golfer preference.

A solar-assisted cart might obtain an energy savings of 12 per cent over a conventional electric cart which is much less than manufacturer claims of 30-50 per cent. More importantly the study found that the energy consumed by the carts varied greatly, indicating that other factors relating to cart condition (e.g tire pressure, new bearings) or driver behaviour may be more important than the solar panels in determining overall energy consumption. The report concludes that a well-maintained electric cart, free of mechanical problems may offer better energy and financial savings than the purchase of solar panels.

“We supported this study because we felt it’s important for golf courses in Canada to get a true picture of what they need to do to become more environmentally friendly, ” Said Ryan McCutcheon, Bennett Golf Cars. “As manufacturers of golf carts we’re always looking for the best approach to meet the needs of our clients, and it’s interesting to see that going solar isn’t the best way to go.”

There are at least 179 golf courses within a 100 radius around Toronto, of which roughly 80 per cent are estimated to use electric carts, while the remaining use gas. According to the Sustainable Technologies Evaluation Program, if the 20 per cent were replaced with electric carts, this could reduce emissions by approx. 3.8 tonnes CO2 per day in an annual golf season, an amount roughly equivalent to taking 155 mid-sized gasoline cars off the road.

“The study is beneficial for golf course operators who are looking to green their operations in a cost-effective way,” said Joe Petta, Manager, Bathurst Glen Golf Course. “We recently achieved Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program Certification, which is the highest level eco-certification a course can get for Environmental Planning, Wildlife & Habitat Management, Outreach and Education, Chemical Use Reduction and Safety, Water Conservation, and Water Quality Management. Our next step is to take the data from the golf cart study to begin moving forward with a plan to bring electric carts to our course.”

The study was made possible by funding support from Bennett Golf Cars and TRCA municipal partners. The full report is available for download at http://www.sustainabletechnologies.ca

With more than 50 years of experience, TRCA helps people understand, enjoy and look after the natural environment. TRCA’s vision is for The Living City – where human settlement can flourish forever as part of nature’s beauty and diversity. For more information, call 416-661-6600 or visit us at .www.trca.on.ca

EZGO Introduces Freedom® TXT® and Shuttle 2+2 TXT® Vehicles

October 19, 2010 Comments off

(AUGUSTA, GA) — E-Z-GO, a Textron (NYSE:TXT) Company, announces the expansion of its line of personal vehicles with the introduction of the Freedom® TXT® and Shuttle 2+2 TXT®. These vehicles combine the classic styling and features of the E-Z-GO TXT platform with new powerplants and technology, including the choice of models equipped with either a 48-volt DC electric drivetrain or a 13 hp gas-powered Kawasaki® engine.

The Freedom TXT seats up to two people and is equipped with a golf-bag rack and sweater basket for easy transition from the course to community paths. With its rear-facing second bench seat, the Shuttle 2+2 TXT seats up to four people and can be outfitted with an optional four-bag attachment for golf use.

“E-Z-GO is pleased to offer these new models in our celebrated TXT vehicle line,” said Kevin Holleran, president of E-Z-GO. “The combination of proven TXT features and new powertrain technology will make the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT vehicles a popular choice for consumers seeking stylish, fun and energy-efficient ways to move around their neighborhood paths.”

Electric models of the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT feature a 48-volt DC drivetrain with    E-Z-GO’s exclusive TruCourse Technology, which allows the vehicle owner to customize the vehicle’s speed, acceleration and other operating characteristics to meet their unique needs.

Gas-powered models are equipped with a 13 hp Kawasaki engine that delivers exceptional power and torque, while conserving fuel due to the engine’s single-cylinder design with a hemispheric combustion chamber. The engine meets all emissions standards of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the California Air Resources Board.

Both models retain the popular styling and proven features of the E-Z-GO TXT platform, including a welded tubular steel frame with powder-coat protection, scratch-resistant body panels, center-mounted cup, ball and tee holders, slip-resistant floormats, double-walled canopy and handle, and a walkaway braking alarm.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT also feature headlights, tail lights, brake lights and horns. Electric models include a DC-to-DC converter to allow for optimal installation of additional powered accessories.

To meet the specific needs or style of any owner, the Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT can be customized with a wide variety of factory-installed options or E-Z-GO genuine parts and accessories, including alloy wheels, turn signals, weather enclosures, locking glove boxes, and chrome or stainless-steel brush guards and kickplates.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT are manufactured in Augusta, Ga., at E-Z-GO’s world headquarters, recently honored as one of the top ten manufacturing facilities in North America by Industry Week magazine.

The Freedom TXT and Shuttle 2+2 TXT vehicles are available for purchase now from your local E-Z-GO authorized dealer. To locate your nearest dealer or learn more about the complete line of E-Z-GO light-transportation vehicles, please visit www.ezgo.com. To follow E-Z-GO news, events and announcements on Facebook, please visit www.facebook.com/4ezgo.

Which should you choose Gas vs. Electric?

August 18, 2010 Comments off
E-Z-GO ST Custom

E-Z-GO's ST Custom

 

Thousands of golfers drive golf carts each day as they maneuver the many courses in the United States and around the globe. Thousands more use golf carts for regular transportation. Anyone who has considered buying a golf cart knows the first step is to decide whether to buy a gas or electric golf cart. Each of the two main varieties offer a range of benefits and drawbacks, and understanding them plays a key role in the selection process. 

The Facts 

Gas-powered golf carts operate with a traditional combustion engine. Most are four-cycle engines, but some two-cycle engines exist. Drivers fuel them with regular automobile gas, which can be added via a traditional gas station fuel pump or by dumping in gas from a can. Large rechargeable 38- or 48-volt battery cells power electric golf carts. The batteries must be charged regularly to ensure that the carts can continue to operate. When battery power fades, the cart’s speed slows. Both types of carts have benefits and drawbacks, and the cart that a particular person prefers depends largely on personal preferences and intended use. Most cart owners drive battery-powered carts. 

Gas Benefits 

Some golf cart owners prefer gas-powered golf carts because they run at faster speeds, can pull heavier loads and are easy to refill. More speed means making it from one place to the next in less time. As well, faster carts are sometimes allowed to drive on roads where slow-moving electric carts are not able to maintain minimum speeds. Given their benefits, gas carts are often popular among those who prefer a custom-built cart. These sorts of carts feature more amenities and options, which drives up the price of the carts. 

Electric Benefits 

Electric golf carts produce no emissions. Thus, they are friendlier to the environment. They also produce less noise than gas carts. Most electric golf carts cost slightly less to purchase and they are less frequently used for custom-built carts. Used electric carts are generally less costly to purchase than their gas-powered counterparts and they are more readily available. As well, electric golf carts cost less to maintain and operate because recharging them is less expensive than buying gas for a gas cart and because they do not require as much constant maintenance. 

Gas Drawbacks 

With gas-powered carts, a driver only needs to dump a gallon of fuel into a cart to resume operation, but the fuel also produces more pollution. The carbon-monoxide emissions pose a threat to health when carts are operated within enclosed spaces such as a garage. As well, gas carts make more noise and require regular maintenance in the form of oil changes. 

Electric Drawbacks 

Electric golf carts pose problems because it can be more difficult to estimate when they will run out of power and they are more difficult to recharge. If a cart runs out of battery power on the golf course or in another location away from a charging unit, drivers can be stranded; in addition, electric carts feature batteries that are not easily removed for charging. In many cases, they need to be towed or pushed when they run out of power. 

Source: EHow.com