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Posts Tagged ‘Electric car’

E-Z-GO Introduces Exceed Hybrid Technology

July 14, 2011 Comments off

Introducing Exceed Hybrid Technology™, the fully integrated supplemental power source for E-Z-GO electric vehicles. This groundbreaking system, now available on the E-Z-GO®  Freedom RXV® personal golf car and E-Z-GO 2Five® street-legal vehicle, allows vehicles to travel up to 150 miles on a single charge by supplementing the vehicle’s 48-volt electric powertrain with a small gas-powered generator.

The Exceed system adds a 6hp, 205cc gas-powered generator to the patented 48-volt AC Drive system featured on the electric Freedom RXV and 2Five. When engaged, the generator recharges the vehicle’s batteries on the fly, greatly extending the range that the vehicle can travel on a single charge. The system’s single-cylinder, low-emissions gas-powered engine meets all EPA and California Air Resources Board (CARB) standards.

The Exceed system also features a 400-watt power source to allow for the charging and use of small electronic devices such as radios, mobile phones, and laptop computers. A standard 120-volt, three-pronged electrical outlet is mounted in the dashboard of the vehicle to allow for convenient use of such items from the vehicle’s cabin.

Exceed Hybrid Technology seamlessly integrates with your E-Z-GO vehicle for simple operation and a sharp fit and finish. All system controls are mounted in the vehicle’s dash within easy reach. The Exceed system itself mounts into the vehicle’s rear bagwell and is fitted with a specially designed cover to protect the system and provide a clean, integrated look.

In tests simulating real-world, “stop-and-go” use, a four-passenger, Exceed-equipped 2Five under an average load and traveling at a speed of 16 mph, was able to traverse 150 miles between charges. Actual distance will vary depending on numerous factors, including a vehicle’s load, weather conditions, the terrain, and any optional equipment installed.

Exceed Hybrid Technology will be available in August as a factory-installed option for the E-Z-GO Freedom RXV® personal golf car and on the E-Z-GO 2Five® street-legal vehicle. Existing owners of those models will soon be able to upgrade their vehicles with an aftermarket Exceed Hybrid Technology kit available for installation at E-Z-GO Authorized Dealers. To find your local dealer, please use the E-Z-GO Dealer Locator.

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RMI Golf Carts Battery Tips

June 8, 2011 Comments off

ELECTRIC GOLF CARS AND LEAD-ACID BATTERY CARE

A short check-list of how to take care of your electric golf car and its batteries, prepared by RMI Golf Carts

 

Batteries: “RMI’s Three Rules of Battery Maintenance”

            Rule #1: “Keep ‘em Clean.” (Keep the top of the battery cases clean and dry. Sprinkle some baking soda on the cases and rinse them off when dirty with hose water; clean the green corrosion off the battery posts and cables with a wire brush whenever corrosion starts to form. Treat the posts with spray terminal protector, not “axle grease.”)

            Rule #2: “Keep ‘em Watered.” (Check water once a month in each cell. DO NOT let the electrolyte level fall below the top of the “plates” inside the cell! Use distilled or reverse-osmosis filtered water if possible, to remove harmful minerals from the water you put into the batteries. Do your final water level check after the batteries are charged, and fill only to 1/8” below the bottom of the neck of the filler cap opening. Over-filling causes the electrolyte to be ejected through the battery caps on to the top of the battery case.)

            Rule #3: “Don’t let ‘em Freeze.” (This means keeping the batteries charged. A fully-charged set won’t freeze until the temp falls to -92F. A discharged set will freeze at 19F above. The best care for an electric golf car is to play at least one round of golf every month. If you cannot take your golf car out in the winter, check your charger every 30 days for a “green light,” and force a charge cycle by unplugging the charger from the car and plugging it back in. Make sure your “run-tow switch” is on tow whenever the car is not in use!

 

Charging Frequency: “Charge your car only Three Times!”

            With modern fully-automatic chargers, your batteries like to be charged, and there is little danger of over-charging your batteries. Charge your electric car three times: “SOON, OFTEN, …. and at EVERY OPPORTUNITY!” Lead-acid batteries do NOT have a “memory!” When you get a chance, “double charge” your batteries—run a second charge cycle before using your car. Manufacturers call it “equalization charging,” and it forces a full charge on every cell. (Normally the charger shuts down when the battery pack meets specifications, and one or more cells are left under-charged). If you can “equalize” once every month, you are “getting it done!”

 

New Batteries: “Season” with care!

            New batteries like to be “seasoned” if possible. If you can, just play nine holes before charging. Repeat for several days. And then play no more than 18 before charging, for as many times as possible. Always charge your batteries after play. The batteries will get better and better “run time” capacity for the first 50-100 charge cycles. Finally, remember to bring your golf car in at least every two years for a “discharge test,” which will often detect a faulty battery before you have to replace the full battery set.

Bad Boy Buggies Tax Credit Info

February 23, 2011 Comments off

Street Legal and Safety Equipped

As a Low Speed Vehicle (LSV) the XTO LSV, Classic LSV XTO Safari LSV and LT LSV meet all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards required for LSVs (49 CFR 571.500). LSVs may be operated in most states on streets with a posted speed limit of 35 miles per hour or less!

The regulation of LSVs differ from state and state. You must comply with all registration requirements and rules of the road for your specific state. Prior to operating a LSV on the streets of a particular state you will need to register the LSV with the applicable state department or division as a motor vehicle, and must follow all rules of the road for that state.

http://www.badboybuggies.com/lsv.php

Gas vs Electric Powered Golf Carts

November 10, 2010 Comments off

Application & Preference

When new customers come in they invariably ask, “What’s better, gas or electric?” My answer is always the same – it largely depends on how you plan to use your golf car and what your preferences are. These days, people get pretty creative with their golf carts so the intended uses can vary more than you might think. For the average user either type of golf car will make a perfectly fine recreational vehicle. Electric golf carts run nearly silently and have no fuels or oils to deal with, perfect for supporters of the green movement. Gas golf carts are a little more on the noisy side and will obviously require gas to operate – regular unleaded, to be exact.

Electric golf carts do depend on their batteries for power, so if you’re someone who wants to use your golf cart for hours upon hours at a time, you may want to stick with gas. This especially holds true for those that enjoy camping and RVing – if you don’t have access to power neither will your electric golf cart.

Another point that’s often forgotten is the amount of accessories you plan to install on your golf cart. If you want stereos, lighting, fans, heaters, etc. all of this takes a considerable amount of power. For an electric cart this energy comes right out of the same bank of batteries that your motor relies on. Gas golf cart accessories will also rely on battery power, however, they feature a starter/generator that will charge the battery on its own while the gas pedal is depressed. This doesn’t mean a gas golf cart battery is invincible – any accessories left on while the cart isn’t running will eventually kill your battery.

Performance

In the beginning, golf cars were designed to simply be what their name implies – cars for golfing. While either type of cart can easily haul you and a friend around most reasonable kinds of terrain there are other points to consider when making a decision – especially for those who expect (or demand) a little more.

With horsepower ratings ranging from 10-12 HP, gas golf cars are as much as 3-4 times more powerful than their electric counterparts. An electric golf cart, on average, will feature a 3-5 HP electric motor – but that’s not to say electric carts aren’t impressively powerful in their own right. Light hauling and yard work can be done with either type of vehicle and both will perform satisfactorily. However, those who demand power in off-road conditions with rugged terrain and steep inclines will almost always want to stick with gas power.

As we mentioned before, electric golf carts aren’t for those who wish to joy ride for hours a day. An electric cart will typically get around two hours of continuous motor run time before the batteries will need re-charging. This translates to anywhere between 18-25 miles depending on usage and the terrain – still pretty impressive. On the gas side of things manufacturers have made great strides in improving gas efficiency and the Yamaha Drive currently leads the pack in fuel economy by averaging nearly 29 MPG.

Aside from power sources and horsepower ratings, both types of vehicles operate in much the same fashion. To the untrained eye you couldn’t tell the two apart from each other and for the most part they both ride and handle the same. Both types of vehicles will get about 14-15 mph top-speed (unmodified).

Maintenance

All in all, both types of golf carts have fairly light requirements when it comes to maintenance. With electric carts your main concern lies within your batteries – make sure you check the water levels monthly (at least) and top-off as needed. The batteries are the life-blood of an electric car and with a replacement set costing well over $600 these days it’s not something you want to ignore. With proper maintenance of batteries and responsible charging habits you can expect to get 5-6 years (sometimes longer) of solid performance before they will need replacing. In comparison, neglecting your batteries can shorten their lifespan to as little as 1-2 years.

Gas golf carts, on the other hand, do require periodic oil changes as well as replacement air/fuel filters and spark plugs when necessary. For the do-it-yourselfer it’s pretty routine stuff if you don’t mind getting a little dirty. Filters are relatively inexpensive and golf cart motors take only a quart or so of 10W30 oil after every 250 hours of motor run time. The best way to stay on top of maintenance is to purchase and install an hour meter for the motor and with proper care a gas golf cart can last you a lifetime.

Summary

Now that you have a better idea of how both gas and electric golf cars operate, hopefully you’ll have an easier time making a decision. Keep in mind, this article is comparing “standard” golf carts. There are motor and controller upgrades out there to get the power of a gas golf car (and more) in electric form – though that is beyond the scope of this article.

Source: Diversified Golf Cars